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Backlinks: Strategies that Help Build Your Busi...
9,95 € *
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One of the biggest problems everyone faces is knowing where to start. No doubt you have a ton of ideas for things you want to try but you also have a million questions and "what if" scenarios. The most important thing you can do now is start. Do something. Anything. Find yourself a product you want to promote on www.Clickbank.comand follow the steps in Keyword Flood to find the easiest keywords to target. Write ten articles targeting the lowest hanging fruit you find and drive people straight to the sales page. Build an authority wheel for each article and go backlink mad on all the article and authority wheel pages. Backlink everything. Target a new product. Write new articles. Make new authority wheels and go on another backlinking spree. Learn to make social bookmarking and RSS feeds work for you. Get more info from this book. 1. Language: English. Narrator: James Luckhurst. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/025473/bk_acx0_025473_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.10.2020
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Fiverr Secrets: Money Making Gig Selling Secret...
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Fiverr Gig Secrets for Making a Lot of Money Inside this audiobook, I reveal the secrets to succeeding on Fiverr.com. Yes, you can make a lot of money selling gigs, and I know exactly how. I've been a full-time Internet marketer since 2012. Inside of this book, I reveal the best of the best Internet marketing strategies that have helped me make thousands of dollars with just a couple of Fiverr gigs. Along with me providing proven methods of succeeding at selling gig services, I also include a list of the top money making gigs, where you can get the products or services you need to offer and how to outperform the competition. Ideas from the book on making money with Fiverr.com: You Always Want to Optimize Your Gig Page: If you don't know anything about SEO, you need to get up to speed on the importance of keyword phrases. When you create your gig page, you must include keyword phrases in your content that potential buyers would use to find your gig. The only way someone is going to find you is through using this search feature. The keywords should be included in your description title, and tags. You've Got to Maintain A 100% Gig Rating: No matter what, you have to have satisfied customers. If you will communicate with your customers from the moment they order your gig until you deliver, you will get repeat business. As you can see, the content presented inside of the book, Fiverr: Top Gig Selling Success Secrets for Making Money on Fiverr, is straightforward and to the point. You won't be wasting your time sifting through a pile of egotistical ramblings to find good content. NO! You are going to learn the best of the best condensed information on how to make money on Fiverr.com. 1. Language: English. Narrator: JC Anonymous. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/034805/bk_acx0_034805_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.10.2020
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63 Ways to Drive More Traffic to Your Website: ...
9,95 € *
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SEO expert and Internet marketing authority Dan Howe lays out a simple-to-follow menu of over 60 actionable ideas sure to generate the traffic you've been looking for. In this audiobook you'll learn the same tactics the pros use to drag in thousands of targeted viewers from all corners of the globe: Develop high-quality, unique content Don't stop adding content Get a memorable domain name How to buy domain mistakes Make your domain easy to read Use keywords in your image files Optimize your page titles Achieving organic SEO Submitting to niche directories Article marketing Guest blogging Newsletter submissions Submitting tips to forums Using keywords in online profiles One-way versus reciprocal links Inviting others to publish content on your site Newsletter publications Newsletter directories Build traffic by publishing a minicourse Testimonials Become a forum authority Post ads in free forums Be helpful in discussion lists Build keyword-rich press releases Create a lively community blog RSS feeds RSS to email Tending to broken links Set up a podcast Maximize internal linking Keep an eye out for new fads, or go evergreen Stay up with the latest affiliate programs 1. Language: English. Narrator: Steve Williams. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/051110/bk_acx0_051110_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.10.2020
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Passive Income: Making Money with Your Content:...
9,95 € *
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Are you looking for the easiest way to generate passive income without a big inversion?Have you heard most of the books that promise a "passive income streams", but they're only generic ways that everyone can search on Google? Well, dear listener, don't search for more, this book is the right one for you.How is this book different from the rest?You won't hear a generic list of 20 "passive income" ideas: ideas that everyone one can find on the Internet. I will explain step by step what you must do to generate passive income with this easy-to-understand method in detail.I will not write about my personal life. I am sure what you are looking for is quality content related to generating passive income and that is what I am going to offer you - pure valuable content.But what is that method? I'm sure you're wondering?What you will learn here is how to create passive income by publishing Ebooks on Amazon Kindle. But wait, you do not need to be the best author to generate money with this method. You do not need to create a huge Ebook. All you need is to share your experience on a subject that has demand, and I will teach you that and much more!What you will learn will be the following:Find a profitable niche market Non-fiction: I will share the method that I use to find profitable markets in the non-fiction category.Keyword Research: This is the most important part of the process, and if we do correctly, we have success in our hands.The correct way to create a title for our Ebook: Learn how we can be ranked for any keyword and get a lot of sales.How to get our initial reviews: Learn how to get tons of review without break the Amazon terms and conditions.Promoting our content on Facebook & Twitter: Learn how to use Facebook and Twitter to help us position our ebook. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Charles Olsen. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/123473/bk_acx0_123473_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.10.2020
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Thinking in Java
57,99 € *
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Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoThinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.10.2020
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Thinking in Java
57,99 € *
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Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters. Product Description "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Features + Benefits Bruce Eckel's Classic, award-winning Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition--now fully updated and revised for J2SE 5.0! ° The awards for this book keep piling up! They include Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for best book, 2003; Java Devloper's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book, 2003, 2001, 1998; JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2001; Software Development Magazine Productivity Award, 1999 ° 12 new chapters including chapters on Generics and Arrays Backcover "Thinking in Java should be read cover to cover by every Java programmer, then kept close at hand for frequent reference. The exercises are challenging, and the chapter on Collections is superb! Not only did this book help me to pass the Sun Certified Java Programmer exam; it's also the first book I turn to whenever I have a Java question." -Jim Pleger, Loudoun County (Virginia) Government"Much better than any other Java book I've seen. Make that 'by an order of magnitude'.... Very complete, with excellent right-to-the-point examples and intelligent, not dumbed-down, explanations.... In contrast to many other Java books I found it to be unusually mature, consistent, intellectually honest, well-written, and precise. IMHO, an ideal book for studying Java." -Anatoly Vorobey, Technion University, Haifa, Israel"Absolutely one of the best programming tutorials I've seen for any language." -Joakim Ziegler, FIX sysop"Thank you again for your awesome book. I was really floundering (being a non-C programmer), but your book has brought me up to speed as fast as I could read it. It's really cool to be able to understand the underlying principles and concepts from the start, rather than having to try to build that conceptual model through trial and error. Hopefully I will be able to attend your seminar in the not-too-distant future." -Randall R. Hawley, automation technician, Eli Lilly & Co."This is one of the best books I've read about a programming language.... The best book ever written on Java." -Ravindra Pai, Oracle Corporation, SUNOS product line"Bruce, your book is wonderful! Your explanations are clear and direct. Through your fantastic book I have gained a tremendous amount of Java knowledge. The exercises are also fantastic and do an excellent job reinforcing the ideas explained throughout the chapters. I look forward to reading more books written by you. Thank you for the tremendous service that you are providing by writing such great books. My code will be much better after reading Thinking in Java. I thank you and I'm sure any programmers who will have to maintain my code are also grateful to you." -Yvonne Watkins, Java artisan, Discover Technologies, Inc."Other books cover the what of Java (describing the syntax and the libraries) or the how of Java (practical programming examples). Thinking in Java is the only book I know that explains the why of Java: Why it was designed the way it was, why it works the way it does, why it sometimes doesn't work, why it's better than C++, why it's not. Although it also does a good job of teaching the what and how of the language, Thinking in Java is definitely the thinking person's choice in a Java book." -Robert S. StephensonAwards for Thinking in Java2003 Software Development Magazine Jolt Award for Best Book 2003 Java Developer's Journal Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 2001 JavaWorld Editor's Choice Award for Best Book 2000 JavaWorld Reader's Choice Award for Best Book 1999 Software Development Magazine Productivity Award 1998 Java Developer's Journal Editor's Choice Award for Best Book Thinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. The classic object-oriented introduction for beginners and experts alike, fully updated for Java SE5/6 with many new examples and chapters! Test framework shows program output. Design patterns are shown with multiple examples throughout: Adapter, Bridge, Chain of Responsibility, Command, Decorator, Facade, Factory Method, Flyweight, Iterator, Data Transfer Object, Null Object, Proxy, Singleton, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. Introduction to XML for data transfer; SWT, Flash for user interfaces. Completely rewritten concurrency chapter gives you a solid grasp of threading fundamentals. 500+ working Java programs in 700+ compiling files, rewritten for this edition and Java SE5/6. Companion web site includes all source code, annotated solution guide, weblog, and multimedia seminars. Thorough coverage of fundamentals; demonstrates advanced topics. Explains sound object-oriented principles. Hands-On Java Seminar CD available online, with full multimedia seminar by Bruce Eckel. Live seminars, consulting, and reviews available. See www.MindView.net Download seven free sample chapters from Thinking in Java, Fourth Edition. Visit http://mindview.net/Books/TIJ4 . Preface 1 Introduction 13 Prerequisites 14 Learning Java 14 Goals 15 Teaching from this book 16 JDK HTML documentation 17 Exercises 17 Foundations for Java 18 Source code 18 Errors 21 Introduction to Objects 23 The progress of abstraction 24 An object has an interface 26 An object provides services 29 The hidden implementation 30 Reusing the implementation 32 Inheritance 33 Interchangeable objects with polymorphism 38 The singly rooted hierarchy 43 Containers 44 Object creation & lifetime 46 Exception handling: dealing with errors 49 Concurrent programming 50 Java and the Internet 51 Summary 60 Everything Is an Object 61 You manipulate objects with references 61 You must create all the objects 63 You never need to destroy an object 67 Creating new data types: class 69 Methods, arguments, and return values 72 Building a Java program 74 Your first Java program 78 Comments and embedded documentation 81 Coding style 88 Summary 89 Exercises 89 Operators 93 Simpler print statements 93 Using Java operators 94 Precedence 95 Assignment 95 Mathematical operators 98 Auto increment and decrement 101 Relational operators 103 Logical operators 105 Literals 108 Bitwise operators 111 Shift operators 112 Ternary if-else operator 116 String operator + and += 118 Common pitfalls when using operators 119 Casting operators 120 Java has no "sizeof" 122 A compendium of operators 123 Summary 133 Controlling Execution 135 true and false 135 if-else 135 Iteration 137 Foreach syntax 140 return 143 break and continue 144 The infamous "goto" 146 switch 151 Summary 154 Initialization & Cleanup 155 Guaranteed initialization with the constructor 155 Method overloading 158 Default constructors 166 The this keyword 167 Cleanup: finalization and garbage collection 173 Member initialization 181 Constructor initialization 185 Array initialization 193 Enumerated types 204 Summary 207 Access Control 209 package: the library unit 210 Java access specifiers 221 Interface and implementation 228 Class access 229 Summary 233 Reusing Classes 237 Composition syntax 237 Inheritance syntax 241 Delegation 246 Combining composition and inheritance 249 Choosing composition vs. inheritance 256 protected 258 Upcasting 260 The final keyword 262 Initialization and class loading 272 Summary 274 Polymorphism 277 Upcasting revisited 278 The twist 281 Constructors and polymorphism 293 Covariant return types 303 Designing with inheritance 304 Summary 310 Interfaces 311 Abstract classes and methods 311 Interfaces 316 Complete decoupling 320 "Multiple in heritance" in Java 326 Extending an interface with inheritance 329 Adapting to an interface 331 Fields in interfaces 335 Nesting interfaces 336 Interfaces and factories 339 Summary 343 Inner Classes 345 Creating inner classes 345 The link to the outer class 347 Using .this and .new 350 Inner classes and upcasting 352 Inner classes in methods and scopes 354 Anonymous inner classes 356 Nested classes 364 Why inner classes? 369 Inheriting from inner classes 382 Can inner classes be overridden? 383 Local inner classes 385 Inner-class identifiers 387 Summary 388 Holding Your Objects 389 Generics and type-safe containers 390 Basic concepts 394 Adding groups of elements 396 Printing containers 398 List 401 Iterator 406 LinkedList 410 Stack 412 Set 415 Map 419 Queue 423 Collection vs. Iterator 427 Foreach and iterators 431 Summary 437 Error Handling with Exceptions 443 Concepts 444 Basic exceptions 445 Catching an exception 447 Creating your own exceptions 449 The exception specification 457 Catching any exception 458 Standard Java exceptions 468 Performing cleanup with finally 471 Exception restrictions 479 Constructors 483 Exception matching 489 Alternative approaches 490 Exception guidelines 500 Summary 501 Strings 503 Immutable Strings 503 Overloading &8216;+' vs. StringBuilder 504 Unintended recursion 509 Operations on Strings 511 Formatting output 514 Regular expressions 523 Scanning input 546 StringTokenizer 551 Summary 552 Type Information 553 The need for RTTI 553 The Class object 556 Checking before a cast 569 Registered factories 582 instanceof vs. Class equivalence 586 Reflection: runtime class information 588 Dynamic proxies 593 Null Objects 598 Interfaces and type information 607 Summary 613 Generics 617 Comparison with C++ 618 Simple generics 619 Generic interfaces 627 Generic methods 631 Anonymous inner classes 645 Building complex models 647 The mystery of erasure 650 Compensating for erasure 662 Bounds 673 Wildcards 677 Issues 694 Self-bounded types 701 Dynamic type safety 710 Exceptions 711 Mixins 713 Latent typing 721 Compensating for the lack of latent typing 726 Using function objects as strategies 737 Summary: Is casting really so bad? 743 Arrays 747 Why arrays are special 747 Arrays are first-class objects 749 Returning an array 753 Multidimensional arrays 754 Arrays and generics 759 Creating test data 762 Arrays utilities 775 Summary 786 Containers in Depth 791 Full container taxonomy 791 Filling containers 793 Collection functionality 809 Optional operations 813 List functionality 817 Sets and storage order 821 Queues 827 Understanding Maps 831 Hashing and hash codes 839 Choosing an implementation 858 Utilities 879 Holding references 889 Java 1.0/1.1 containers 893 Summary 900 I/O 901 The File class 901 Input and output 914 Adding attributes and useful interfaces 918 Readers & Writers 922 Off by itself: RandomAccessFile 926 Typical uses of I/O streams 927 File reading & writing utilities 936 Standard I/O 941 Process control 944 New I/O 946 Compression 973 Object serialization 980 XML 1003 Preferences 1006 Summary 1008 Enumerated Types 1011 Basic enum features 1011 Adding methods to an enum 1014 enums in switch statements 1016 The mystery of values() 1017 Implements, not inherits 1020 Random selection 1021 Using interfaces for organization 1022 Using EnumSet instead of flags 1028 Using EnumMap 1030 Constant-specific methods 1032 Multiple dispatching 1047 Summary 1057 Annotations 1059 Basic syntax 1060 Writing annotation processors 1064 Using apt to process annoThinking in Java has earned raves from programmers worldwide for its extraordinary clarity, careful organization, and small, direct programming examples. It's the definitive introduction to object-oriented programming in the language of the world wide web. From the fundamentals of Java syntax to its most advanced features, Thinking in Java is designed to teach, one simple step at a time. Fully updated for J2SE5 with many new examples and chapters.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.10.2020
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Application Layer Proxy to Save Energy in Netwo...
59,00 € *
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Information Technology generates about 2% of the global CO2. Network hosts, most of which are idle most of the time, are maintained fully powered-on at all times only for the purpose of maintaining network presence. This book develops general requirements for proxying and is the first exploration of application-level proxying with the intention of saving energy by maintaining network presence. Proxying for TCP connections, SIP, and Gnutella P2P was investigated. Proxying for P2P lead to the exploration of space and time efficient data structures to reduce the computational requirements of keyword search in the proxy. The use of pre-computation and hierarchical structures for reducing the false positive rate of a Bloom filter was explored. Potential energy savings are shown to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars per year assuming a modest adoption rate of the methods investigated in this book. This book is for professionals in Computer Science looking for ways to design and implement ideas to save energy in computer networks.

Anbieter: Dodax
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Using mnemotechnology in teaching German
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Mnemonic techniques really do work (and I wish I'd learned to use them earlier). Right now I use all the ideas in here to learn mostly languages and other subjects. Mnemonics are memory aids that may appear to be unusual or artificial but are based on the basic principles of learning and memory. Mnemonic techniques and systems have been used for at least 2,500 years, but have been studied experimentally for less than 40 years. Mnemonics are a commonly used learning aid to remember long lists of diseases associated with radiologic expression. This monograph is also helpful for language learners, mostly for German teachers and learners. In monographs are given information about mnemonics and its development, types of mnemonics and using mnemonics for teaching and learning grammar. The use of acronyms, linking by the story, and categorical and schematic organizations, keyword method and loci method are discussed as organizational mnemonic techniques. Mnemonic is an effective and interesting way to teach every foreign language.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.10.2020
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Keywords in Australian Politics
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Keywords in Australian Politics is much more than a dictionary. It outlines the main meanings of over one hundred words essential to understanding contemporary Australian politics. Political language is often used without explanation in the media, public debate, textbooks and lectures. Here at last is a book that provides Australians with the necessary information to use these terms with confidence in public discussion and debate, from the dinner party to the end-of-semester essay. This book defines each keyword, highlights links between different keywords, outlines the main debates concerning each keyword and indicates how they came to be part of Australian political language. Although the book is arranged alphabetically, systematic cross-referencing allows readers to follow their own trails of enquiry. This book is essential reading for everyone who wants to understand Australian political culture and ideas.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 21.10.2020
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